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Swiss study does not prove aluminium causes breast cancer

9 May 2017

You may have read reports about the Swiss National Council’s proposed action following a study* published in September 2016 which looked at the effects of aluminium on breast cells in the laboratory.  We are disappointed to hear of this proposed action in Switzerland, as while the study might be of academic interest, it does not reflect actual use of aluminium in cosmetic products.  The authors of the study do not, and cannot, make a direct link between the results of their research and a possible link between aluminium in underarm cosmetics and breast cancer.

The Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (the SCCS) the European Commission’s independent panel of experts is looking at the safe use of aluminium in cosmetic products.  However the SCCS has already stated that the available information does not support concerns regarding potential carcinogenicity of aluminium compounds and the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminium exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer.

The use of any ingredient in a cosmetic product, including aluminium used in under arm cosmetics, must be safe.  Safety assessors, who sign the safety assessment in their personal capacity as a trained, professional scientist, must be confident in the information they have to be sure the cosmetic product is safe for use, as it is used, where it is to be used and how often it will be used. 

Read more on deodorants and anti-perspirants and aluminium 

Read what Prof. Paul Pharoah, Professor of Cancer Epidemiology at the University of Cambridge said to the Science Media Centre about the study and the view of Baroness Delyth Morgan, Chief Executive at Breast Cancer Now 

Also read Cancer Research UK and Breast Cancer Now refuting claims that such products cause cancer.